Valve Trombones

Reynolds valve trombone bore sizes gradually increased over the model line’s history, from .483″ (1953) to .500″ (1959) to .510″ (1970) to .515″ (1977).

1936-1946
Model Size Description Example
TBD Bore: TBD
Bell: 7½”
Reynolds Valve Trombone | Body: brass bell, tuning slide and gooseneck; nickel-silver bracing and trim; round counterweight; beveled slide lock | Valves: TBD | Finish: clear lacquer; optional silverplate (shown) | Same bell section as Reynolds Tenor Trombone [B1] SN 20585; photos used with permission from eBay Member: azfastsell.
1947-1952

Shortly after Scherl & Roth bought the F.A. Reynolds Co. in 1946, the Reynolds trombones underwent significant changes and adopted more of an Olds-style design. Whereas the straight tenor trombone advanced its design to include more nickel-silver (cf. gooseneck, tuning crook), the valve trombone initially retained original brass materials for these parts, making it identical to the new Emperor model introduced in 1947. By the early 1950s, however, the valve trombone was sold with the same bell section as the Professional tenor.

Model Size Description Example
TBD Bore: TBD
Bell: 7½”
Reynolds Valve Trombone | Body: brass bell, tuning crook and gooseneck; nickel-silver bracing and trim; brass “R” counterweight | Valves: TBD | Finish: clear lacquer finish; optional silverplate bright bell or silverplate gold bell finish. | Same bell section as Emperor Tenor Trombone 15-B SN 24339; photos used with permission from eBay Member: isthatformellc.
1952-1964
Model Size Description Example
75 Bore: .483″ (.500″ in 1959)
Bell: 7½”
Professional Valve Trombone | Body: brass bell; nickel silver gooseneck, tuning crook, bracing and trim; brass “R” counterweight | Valves: TBD; slide section available separately | Finish: clear lacquer finish; optional silverplate bright bell or silverplate gold bell finish. Model 75 [SN 45627]. Photos used with permission from David Reed (eBay Member: dgreeddgreedjr).
79 Bore: .520″
Bell: 8½”
Contempora Valve Trombone | Body: Bronz-o-lyte bell; nickel-silver tone ring, gooseneck, tuning slide and trim | Valves: brass valve section with nickel-silver upper valve casings (balusters); slide section available separately | Finish: clear lacquer finish; optional silverplate bright bell or silverplate gold bell finish. Model 79 [SN 57472]. Photo source: eBay.
1964-1970
Model Size Description Example
TV-28 Bore: .510″
Bell: 8½”
Professional Valve Trombone | Body: brass bell, gooseneck and tuning crook; nickel-silver bracing and trim; brass “R” counterweight | Valves: TBD; slide section available separately | Finish: polished brass with baked epoxy. Model TV-28 [SN 216775].
1971-1979

Model TV-28 was rebranded from “Professional” to “Contempora” sometime in the mid 1970s and a Marching Trombone (TV-29) was added to the catalog.

Model Size Description Example
TV-28 Bore: .515″
Bell: 8½”
Contempora Valve Trombone | Body: brass with nickel silver bracing and trim; rectangular “reynolds” counterweight | Slide: TBD; .495″/.510″ dual bore slide section available separately | Finish: polished brass with baked epoxy SN A24858. Photo courtesy of eBay Member: nikkibor123456.
TV-29 Bore: .515″
Bell: 8”
Contempora Marching Trombone | Body: brass | Valves: TBD | Finish: polished brass with baked epoxy Model TV-29 [SN A18798].
Notes and Quotes

1953, 1958: “The Valve Trombone for the Professional by Roth-Reynolds is the most popular instrument of its kind in the dance field today. Built on the same design and specifications as the famous Model 70 Professional Tenor Trombone, the Valve Trombone has equally fine playing qualities and round lustrous tone. Perfect for trombone doubling. Also available with slide section for complete combination.”

1959 Roth-Reynolds catalog: “Reynolds Valve Trombones have become recognized for being well in tune. Undoubtedly the most popular and most widely used Valve Trombones.”

1966 Reynolds catalog: “Adds flexibility to the trombone voice. Has 8½” bell, nickel-silver bracing, large bore. Slide section optional extra. With combination case that accommodates bell, valve and slide sections.”

1970 Reynolds catalog: “Large straight bore of .510 provides the full sound so desirable on the parade field. Ideal double for a baritone horn player who wishes to perform with the stage band. Available with an extra slide section for added versatility.”

1977 Reynolds catalog: “The TV-28 is a popular valve trombone used for studio, jazz, concert and marching bands. The large, straight bore provides a full, rich sound. Excellent valve action assures rapid response with precise intonation. Available with extra slide section for added versatility (slight extra cost).”

1977 Reynolds catalog: “The TV-29 is specially designed for the marching band for greater maneuverability while maintaining exceptional response and intonation. The Marching Trombone also permits the baritone player to double on the trombone in the stage band. Lightweight, compact and versatile. The valve action assures rapid response and assists in increased articulation. The straight bell front makes for greater projection of sound.”