Roth Cornets

The Roth cornet was originally manufactured by Ohio Band Instrument Co., a subsidiary of F.A. Reynolds, as part of a Roth Band Instruments line that Scherl & Roth sold through their dealers and distribution channels. The Roth cornet was a sturdy student model, built by Reynolds craftsmen, but lacking features like tuning adjustment rings and slides, or nickel-silver slides and trim. Valves were a basic top-loaded design, but not inner-sprung like the higher end Reynolds models.

As Reynolds and Scherl & Roth consolidated product catalogs entering the 1950's, the Roth instruments were positioned as the basic student models. Eventually the line was replaced by the Medalist instruments introduced in the early 1960's.

1936-1946

Ohio Band Instrument Co. (Cleveland, Ohio)

Models produced through c.1949 feature a traditional “Shepherd’s crook” cornet design, where the bell stem tubing is well rounded coming out of the first valve. Circa 1949-50, the bell stem design changed to straight trumpet-style tubing. The Roth “Tone Tempered” model with nickel-silver bell flare was introduced c.1948-49, but was soon thereafter designated as the new Emperor model cornet when that model line was launched c.1950.

The earliest recorded Roth cornet is SN 22466 (c.1942), though advertisements for Roth instruments exist from 1940.

Model TBD

Roth "shepherd's crook" cornet (example c.1943)

Materials: brass with nickel-silver bracing

Note: This model has a different main tuning slide wrap style than the other examples. Note the additional crook to enter from the front on the left side of the third valve, whereas the later horns have a valve entry point on the right side.

1946-c.1949

Ohio Band Instrument Co. (Cleveland, Ohio)

Around the time that Scherl & Roth took over operations in 1946, there were design changes to the Roth cornet. The leadpipe tubing was extended behind the valve block, eliminating the full turn in front of the valves and now entering the valve block on the right side of the third valve. This would set the pattern for Reynolds' student-level cornets for the next 30 years, including Roth, Medalist and Emperor models.

Toward the end of this time period, the "shepherd's crook" bell tubing was replaced with a more trumpet-like straight tube and crook leading to the bell.

Model 310

Roth "shepherd's crook" cornet (example c.1947)

Bore: .458"
Bell: 4-5/8"
Materials: brass with nickel-silver bracing
Valves: nickel-plated bottom sprung valves

Model 410

Roth cornet with "shepherd's crook" bell and "Tone Tempered" nickel-silver bell flare (example c.1948)

Materials: brass with nickel-silver bracing
Valves: nickel-plated bottom sprung valves

Into the Roth Cornet and Trumpet have gone superlative skill and craftsmanship--for your enjoyment and satisfaction.

The round velvety tone of the true Cornet, and the full strident tone of the true Trumpet--are both here in generous measure. Eye appeal has not been neglected either. The valve caps are of the sunken type--fingerbuttons are streamlined. First, second and third valve slides; top and bottom valve caps; finger hooks and braces are all made of nickel silver.

c.1949 F.A. Reynolds catalog

c.1949-1952

F.A. Reynolds, division of Scherl & Roth (Cleveland, Ohio)

Examples from this time period are engraved as "Made by F.A. Reynolds" rather than "Made by Ohio Band Instr. Co." It appears that the engraving pattern changed to a vertical style, matching the same monogram style change for Reynolds instruments. 

Model 310

Roth cornet

Bore: .458"
Bell: 4¾"
Materials: brass with nickel-silver outer valve slide tubes
Finish: polished brass with clear lacquer finish

Roth band instruments are made by the same fine workmen who produce the famous Reynolds instruments. They were created and designed to meet the demand of the exacting student who needs an instrument moderately priced but high in playing qualities. Roth instruments are sturdily built of the best of materials and are noted for their accurate intonation. Whether playing the high register or low register, you will notice the perfect balance and ease.

The Standard Roth Cornet made in the conventional brass finish. Beautifully designed to give that "comfortable" feeling while playing, with plenty of hand room. Easy to play in all registers, with lightning fast sure-fire valve action. Clear lacquer finish, complete with plush lined French style case.

c.1950 Reynolds catalog

1952-1961

Roth-Reynolds (Cleveland, Ohio)

Roth cornets made c.1952 and later are marked "Made by Roth-Reynolds" instead of "F.A. Reynolds". In addition, the main bell engraving changed to a lengthwise script that simply says “Roth”. Roth instruments became the new entry-level models in the combined Roth-Reynolds catalog and were made primarily of brass components with minimal nickel-silver trim.

Roth Trumpets and Cornets - the greatest value in band instruments today! Designed to guarantee maximum quality at a minimum investment. Carefully made and modern in design, this model is ideal for student musicians. Hand-lapped, nickel silver pistons for years of service. Ease of blowing means young musicians will learn quickly, play proficiently and enoy their instrument. Durable brass with clear lacquer finish and complete with new design trunk style case and special fittings.

1953 Reynolds catalog

Model 310

Roth cornet

Bore: .458"
Bell: 4¾" 
Materials: brass with nickel-silver bracing
Valves: hand-lapped, nickel-silver pistons
Finish: polished brass with clear lacquer finish; optional silverplate with bright bell or gold bell finish

Roth is the cornet of quality most widely used in schools today. It embodies all of the fine workmanship of our craftsmen yet is extemely low priced. Special bore and taper designed for easy blowing so the student will learn quickly and thoroughly enjoy his instrument. Hand-lapped nickel silver pistons, durable construction, beautiful lacquer finish. Complete with Gladstone case and special fittings.

1959 Reynolds catalog

1961-1964

RMC/Reynolds (Cleveland, Ohio)

Sometime after Richards Music purchased Reynolds in 1961, the product catalog was renumbered. The old numbers were replaced with a new scheme that reflected the type of instrument. To the best of knowledge, the instrument specifications did not change, just the model numbers.

Model CR-56

Roth cornet

Bore: .458"
Bell: 4¾"
Materials: brass with nickel-silver bracing
Valves: hand-lapped, nickel-silver pistons
Finish: polished brass with clear lacquer finish; optional silverplate with bright bell or gold bell finish

The purpose of this website is to preserve the history of the F. A. Reynolds Company and the distinctive qualities of its brass instruments. Contempora Corner and contemporacorner.com are not related or associated in any way to the former or current F.A. Reynolds Company.

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