Medalist Trombones

RMC/Reynolds introduced the Medalist line of instruments in 1961 in an attempt to take advantage of the sales opportunities created by expanding school band progams (and funding) in the 1960s. RMC introduced trumpet, cornet and trombone models under the Reynolds name and other Medalist instruments under other subsidiaries.

In order to produce the anticipated volume of needed student instruments, RMC contracted manufacturing of the Medalist lines to a variety of locations. The presence of “Elkhart, Ind” markings on many models indicates horns that were made at the E.K. Blessing factory in Elkhart, Indiana (confirmed by Merle Johnson, former President of Blessing). Other Medalist instruments are marked “Made in USA” and are of unknown origin (if not also made by Blessing).

1961-1964

RMC/Reynolds (Cleveland, Ohio)

The Medalist line effectively replaced the Roth instruments in the RMC/Reynolds catalog. The Roth cornet, trumpet and trombone had been one of the three original instrument lines manufactured at F.A. Reynolds and Ohio Band, along with the Reynolds and Regent lines, and were noted for their durability and value. Conversely, Paul Rawlins notes that the early student horns produced by RMC-Reynolds were made with low-quality, inexpensive sheet brass. The concept was to put a cheap horn in a durable Samsonite case and sell the package to the student rental market. The approach worked until it was discovered that the low-quality brass used to make the horns could not be repaired without permanent damage to the metal.

Model TO-58

Medalist Tenor Trombone

Bore: .500"
Bell:
7½"
Materials
: brass with nickel-silver outer tuning slides
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with nickel-silver slide bow; chrome-plated hand grip
Finish: clear lacquer finish; optional silver-plate finish with gold-plated bell

For the beginning and the young student trombonist, here is an instrument that includes all of the basic features of the finest model in the Reynolds line. It has the famous Reynolds slide of hard drawn nickel silver, precision-plated in chromium for non-jamming action. The outer slide is a bearing-type bronze-alloy brass generally found only in artist grade trombones. Its medium bore and 7½ inch bell make this a light-weight instruments that responds immediately and easily with a full rich tone. For extra strength under hard student use, the bell-to-slide receiver is of extra strong one-piece construction and the hard grip is hard chrome-plate. Additional features include nickel-silver tuning slide and outer slide bow for anticorrosion properties in critical areas.

c.1963 RMC/Reynolds catalog

A special bass trombone adapted to particular student requirements that still offers the advantage of the extended range provided by our other bass trombones. It is designed with a scientifically determined bore of such size to give students easy control of this instrument at a time when they have not developed to the point of filling professionally sized bass trombones.

c.1963 RMC/Reynolds catalog

Model TO-57

Medalist Trombone with F Attachment

Materials: brass with nickel-silver bell-to-slide receiver
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with nickel-silver slide bow; brass and nickel silver hand grip
Valve: rotary valve with closed-wrap F attachment
Finish: clear lacquer finish; optional silver-plate finish with gold-plated bell

1964-1970

Reynolds (Fullerton, Calif.)

After CMI purchased the assets to the Reynolds business, all trumpets, cornets, trombones and French horns were made at the Olds factory in Fullerton, Calif. There were typically slight adjustments to the model designs and specifications compared to the Cleveland instruments, however, the Medalist straight tenor underwent a more extensive transformation.

Medalist straight tenor trombones made in Fullerton were essentially rebranded versions of Olds' Ambassador Model A-15. Key changes include Olds' traditional dual-bore design, changes to the bracing ferrules and the move of the bell/slide connection nut from Reynolds’ traditional placement on the bell section to the slide, as on other Olds trombones. Model TO-57 (with F attachment) retained much more of the original Reynolds design.

Model TO-58

Medalist Tenor Trombone

Bore: .485"/.500"
Bell:
7½"
Materials
: brass with nickel-silver bracing and trim
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with chrome-plated hand grip
Finish: polished brass with baked epoxy finish

For young students, but with all the basic features of Reynolds' best. Lightweight for easy response. Medium bore. 7½" bell; extra-strong bell-to-slide receiver; nickel-silver bracing at all points of wear. Professional mouthpiece, music lyre, modern case included.

1966 F.A. Reynolds catalog

Model TO-57

Medalist Trombone with F Attachment

Bore: .515" straight bore
Bell: 8½"
Materials
: brass with nickel-silver bracing and trim
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with nickel-silver hand grips
Valve: rotary valve with closed-wrap F attachment; nickel-silver outer slide tubes
Finish: polished brass with baked epoxy finish

1970-1979

Reynolds (Fullerton, Calif.)

In 1970, Reynolds fully merged production lines with Olds in Fullerton and sold the Abilene plant to Conn. In most cases, a horn would come off the California production line and become either a Reynolds- or Olds-branded instrument based on detailing and finish. These late Reynolds trombones are easily distinguished from earlier models by the rectangular "Reynolds" counterweight.

Model TO-55 (with F attachment) was introduced c.1974 and added the Olds-style dual bore slide.

Model TO-58

Medalist Tenor Trombone

Bore: .485"/.500"
Bell:
7½"
Materials
: brass with nickel-silver bracing and trim
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with chrome-plated hand grip
Finish: polished brass with clear epoxy coating

Designed for the beginning student and constructed to withstand daily use and yet produce musical results equivalent to higher priced models. Hand straightened slides for smooth, fast action. Dual bore for full tones with less effort. Instrument luggage and accessories included.

1974 F.A. Reynolds catalog

Model TO-55

Medalist Trombone with F Attachment

Bore: .495"/.510"
Bell:
8½"
Materials:
brass with nickel-silver bracing and trim
Slide: chrome-plated nickel-silver inner slide tubes; brass outer slide tubes with nickel-silver hand grips
Valve: rotary valve with closed-wrap F attachment
Finish: polished brass with clear epoxy coating

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